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Cultivating the habit of thankfulness: Week #4

It’s been a few weeks since we did this as a blog community (see last one here) and I for one need it.   I went a couple of days this past week with a dark cloud over me. A couple of things set me off and I just went into a funk. I need the discipline of thankfulness.   Thankfulnes…
By Seth Barnes
It’s been a few weeks since we did this as a blog community (see last one here) and I for one need it.
 
I went a couple of days this past week with a dark cloud over me. A couple of things set me off and I just went into a funk. I need the discipline of thankfulness.
 
Thankfulness produces all kinds of good fruit. You recognize blessings God has placed in your life for what they are instead of taking them for granted. You become more humble as you realize afresh that the world doesn’t owe you anything. You become more pleasant to be around as you get an attitude adjustment.
 
So many people I know are subject to their moods as I was last week. They allow themselves to get swept away down a river of negative feelings to a place where no one wants to join them. They unnecessarily allow themselves to be victims, beholden to the whims of fate. 
 
Sometimes I see people who have been single for a while who want to get married and who struggle with this issue. I want to tell them, “Hey, why in the world would anyone want to hang around you when you keep finding yourself hamstrung by circumstances?” Fix your attitude and you’ll become more attractive.
 
A great place to start is to begin cultivating the daily habit of thankfulness. Join with me in writing out the things that you’re thankful for. Write a note of gratitude to those challenging things in your life.
 
A couple from last time to get us going:

Dear Vietnamese Exchange Rate,

Thank you for being so low that I get 20,000 Dong to every US dollar,
ensuring that I overspend my budget by a fortune every day by
overestimating my purchasing power. You are materially improving the
lives of the Vietnamese people everywhere I go.

Cheers,

Joe
————————————————————————————
Dear fragile trust,
Thank you for driving me to my knees.

And dear pals,
Thank you for giving me reason to meet God on my knees with the
question, “Can I trust him (or her).” The freedom I’m still uncovering
in that answer is revolutionary to my once fortressed heart; “Does it
matter? You can trust Me.” Hello world. Hello uncertainty. Hello
ether. I found this hope and I’d be happy to tell you where.

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