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How to throw a pachanga

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A pachanga is a party. But not just any party – it’s a Spanish word that basically means “an awesome party.” We need more pachangas in our lives.   Jesus began his ministry with a wedding party where he kept the wine flowing and we see in Matthew 25 that God wraps things up with a heavenl…
By Seth Barnes
FlamencoA pachanga is a party. But not just any party – it’s a Spanish word that basically means “an awesome party.” We need more pachangas in our lives.
 
Jesus began his ministry with a wedding party where he kept the wine flowing and we see in Matthew 25 that God wraps things up with a heavenly party. God is a partying God. When David gathered together his mighty men, he threw a pachanga for them that lasted three days.
 
Here in Mijas, Spain, they get the concept of a pachanga. Knowing that, I told Andrew Shearman that I’d like to help throw one on the eve of my departure. So last night, for seven hours, we had an amazing party. Because we’re right on the Mediterranean Sea, Zach procured jumbo shrimp, calamari, and mussels to prepare a delectable paella.
 
After dinner, the Shearman grandchildren led us in a series of intergenerational dances. Carol showed up to teach us flamenco techniques. And then we dove into a rousing series of games – “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner” followed by “Like the Adverb” and then some card game that Matt Peters won. The highlight was Andrew acting as a hillbilly Sir Francis Drake to Tara’s hillbilly Queen Elizabeth. It’s been a long time since I laughed so hard.
 
Somewhere in there Nicholas went and got some more food. And it was after midnight when the students gathered around to pray for me and express their appreciation for my visit. I left the place blessed.
 
The Christmas season affords us a great opportunity to celebrate with family and friends. At AIM, Toya, Connie, Tara and Nancy have been working for almost a month decorating and preparing for what promises to be an amazing celebration this weekend. We serve the Lord of the dance. Our tribe works hard and plays hard. The young people invigorate us – they know how to help us older folks have fun.
 
What awesome parties with God’s people have you been a part of? If you saw “My Big Fat Greek Wedding,” you’ll remember the difference between the prudish parents of the groom whose pursed lips and pinched manners collided with the bride’s effusive and eccentric clan. Which family looks more like yours? Doesn’t it stand to reason that we should experience serious joy with those we love most?

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