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Jesus is still in the healing business

What do you believe about healing? A lot of folks who have never experienced God’s healing power explain it away by saying that those gifts have ceased. Tell that to Dan and Becky Haverkos whose story of healing is one of five miracles they describe in their recent blog. Jesus is still in the hea…
By Seth Barnes
By Seth Barnes
What do you believe about healing? A lot of folks who have never experienced God’s healing power explain it away by saying that those gifts have ceased. Tell that to Dan and Becky Haverkos whose story of healing is one of five miracles they describe in their recent blog. Jesus is still in the healing business. Our lack of experience is a poor starting point for constructing a theology of divine inactivity.
 
As we walked into this small village, we were greeted by a woman who was one of the local leaders.  She sat us down and introduced to a few other women from the village. 
 
One of these women had experienced a stroke just two months earlier and the right side of her body had been noticably impaired.  Her right arm hung relatively limply at her side and the right part of her mouth, eye and face sagged as a sad reminder of the life threatening trauma she had gone through. 
 
The women explained that their friend was unable to use her right arm for gardening or manual labor and was not even capable of holding even her smallest child on her right side.

 
As Becky and I knelt down beside her and began to pray we felt the small framed woman start to fall backwards toward the ground.  I could feel Becky’s hesitation, alongside my own, as we both strained to support the woman’s back, so that she wouldn’t recline onto the ground.  After a few minutes of praying we both gave way and laid the woman on the dirt covered ground.  We continued to pray for God to heal this woman’s arm and the right side of her body.  The woman was straining and shaking on the ground.  All of the sudden the woman started speaking out words of prayer and thanksgiving to Jesus Christ.  As we closed out our prayer, we helped to lift the woman to her feet.
 
As we embraced the women and children of the tribe and say our goodbyes the stroke affected woman walked over towards us.  She extended her frail right hand in my direction as she lowered her head in gratitude.  I reached forward and took ahold of her hand.  As I gently squeezed I was amazed to feel what was occurring.  The woman grasped my hand and shook with such force that I can only imagine the governor of California might deliver.  Praise God for His miraculous power.

Comments (7)

  • I say it over and over again, please, Lord, help me in my unbelief. You are so correct that, “Our lack of experience is a poor starting point for constructing a theology of divine inactivity.”

    It is reading these accounts that allows me to utter my feeble words of unbelief less frequently. We need to get out of our Westernized (and arrogant) comfort zone.

    Amen.

  • I love reading stories of what God has done. I think it is a difficult area. You have to listen to God on each individual person I believe. Jesus stepped over a lot of people at the pool of Bethesda who were just as crippled and healed one man and then walked away again. He only did what He saw the Father doing. And though there were many times when it says “He healed all who were there” He didn’t always do that for reasons He knows and I couldn’t even begin to guess at.

    It’s always worth asking God and so often miracles will come. Personally, I believe it’s always important to be listening and to be careful with people’s expectations and hopes. Sometimes God gets a bad name because His followers say He has promised something specific when He hasn’t. Sometimes God is doing something else that in His economy is far more important for salvation. We don’t always see things His way.

    Unbelief in me comes because I am not always sure what He will do, despite knowing what He could be capable of doing. Belief comes from asking Him specifically and doing what He says. He’s always true to what He says. And it is ALWAYS worth asking Him.

  • Yes He is! if our eye’s are open and fixed on HIM we will see them and have belief in them.

  • “Never reduce your theology to match your experience.” -Heidi Baker.

    good blog, seth. so much hinges of belief. A journey that God is bringing me through at this very moment-and that I re learn over and over again.

  • Seth! I’m re-reading these old blogs as I search the scriptures and ponder my experiences in relation to the theology behind cessationism. It’s such a strange thing to believe after experiencing my own healing in my knees and foot. I know the Father heals and it’s incredible. I’m thankful for you sharing these stories over the years.

    “Our lack of experience is a poor starting point for constructing a theology of divine inactivity.” – This quote is so good. I’m saving it.

    “Never reduce your theology to match your experience.” -Heidi Baker.

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Seth Barnes

I'm motivated to join God in his global reclamation project. He's on the move, setting his sons and daughters free from their places of captivity. And he's partnering with those of us who have been freed to go and free others.



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