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Judge people by their fruit, not their words

Just back from 11 days in Romania and Spain. We coached 39 World Racers and taught 20 students at a leadership school. Along the way, we’ve helped them get a world view, forge their identities, and learn to live in community. It’s gratifying to see that the ministry is making a difference in thei…
By Seth Barnes
Just back from 11 days in Romania and Spain. We coached 39 World Racers and taught 20 students at a leadership school. Along the way, we’ve helped them get a world view, forge their identities, and learn to live in community. It’s gratifying to see that the ministry is making a difference in their lives.
 
That’s the real world – but in the anonymity of the blogging universe where people treat each other like cardboard cutouts instead of real people, sometimes I get attacked by Christians for what I believe. And although I could respond with counterpoints, mostly I sense God asking me not to engage in a digital argument.
 
Jesus cared about what his disciples believed. “Who do you say that I am?”  He asked them. On this critical issue, Peter answered well: “You are the Christ.” But beyond that, he saves most of his rebukes not for what they said, but what they did. “We couldn’t cast the demon out,” they said. “Oh ye of little faith,” was his assessment.
 
This was a Hebraic approach to words and actions. Jesus said to look at a person’s fruit (Luke 6:44). The Greek approach can be seen on Mars Hill where words were more important (“Athenians…spent their time doing nothing but talking about and listening to the latest ideas.” Acts 17:21).
 
Our culture seems more Greek than Hebrew. Clearly belief determines action – you need both. But what is more important, your orthodoxy (what you believe) or your orthopraxy (what you do)?

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