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Me vs. the mainstream media – chalk one up for them

I had the wonderful experience of being misquoted in the national press with an article coming out tomorrow. Ugh!! The reporter’s name is Jeff MacDonald. When I saw what he was going to write, we had an extended conversation, but the bottom line was, “it’s already gone to press.” He did agree to …
By Seth Barnes
By Seth Barnes

I had the wonderful experience of being misquoted in the national press with an article coming out tomorrow. Ugh!! The reporter’s name is Jeff MacDonald. When I saw what he was going to write, we had an extended conversation, but the bottom line was, “it’s already gone to press.” He did agree to send me a transcript of our interview.

I was making a point about Matt. 10 being a discipling experience. But it could be viewed as an apologetic for a kind of selfish short-term missions. Here’s my point: Short-term missions find their biblical grounding in Matthew 10 where Jesus sends the 12 disciples out two by two. Clearly this is a training ground for them – a discipling experience.

They get to do what he’s been doing. Later on they go out in bigger numbers (72 of them). They come back thrilled and in the debrief with Jesus, exult about what they’ve seen.

David Livermore, a short-term missions authority was also taken out of context. We compared notes tonight. He said, “Wow…I alluded to something like this but in a very different context.”

So, two questions: how bad does the article look to you and how do I respond?

 

Comments (8)

  • I agree with Tony. It doesn’t praise the effort but seems to be one of those pieces that is intent on planting doubt that could be used to undermine the STM effort.

    Knowing you somewhat, I understand your context in the quote. So, I have a somewhat accepting view of the quote. The parenthetical “paying participants” was certainly a jab. But I am interested to see what those who don’t know you well say about the quote.

    However, back in marketing 101, they said “any publicity is good publicity”. 🙂 Don’t know how you feel about that …

  • Any press is good press when you are an unknown and AIM is an unknown.

    Believing that you can control the message of the press is another blind alley of believing you control anything on your pilmgramage on Earth.

    I’m sure Seth’s intent or motivation was to be honest and to improve the Kingdom. Whatever the intent of the author good or bad (and if bad like Balaam and his hirer) will turn out to be good whether we see can see it or not.

  • I was asking the Lord about that and he said (rather humorously I thought), “Now you know what it’s like when I get quoted out of context!”

  • What comes to my mind is Php. 3 – “..that I might know him and the power of his resurrection, the fellowship of his sufferings(being misquoted), and being made conformed to the image of his death…” Carry on “Torch-Bearer” the Army of Christ, hears his utterance, and they carry out his word. <><

  • Yikes. I would say on a scale of 1-10, with 10 being terrible, the article looks to be on a scale of 5. Not heaping praise on mission trips as discipleship, not talking about the great cultural training that some students get from preparation for their trips, not talking about how some churches/mission agencies focus on local, indigenous connections and ministries and long term goals. The article also doesn’t write off short term missions as a whole either.

    Maybe an indepth explanation here on your blog?

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Seth Barnes

I'm motivated to join God in his global reclamation project. He's on the move, setting his sons and daughters free from their places of captivity. And he's partnering with those of us who have been freed to go and free others.



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