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Strong covenants

There is a sign on a road in Monument, CO that describes a desirable property being developed. Lots are being sold on which homes will be built. One of the benefits this development features is “strong covenants.” It is referring to the restrictions and requirements everyone in the developme…
By Seth Barnes

There is a sign on a road in
Monument, CO that describes a desirable property being developed. Lots are being sold on which homes will be
built. One of the benefits this
development features is “strong covenants.”
It is referring to the restrictions and requirements everyone in the
development chooses into that will maintain the value of the property. For example, in many subdivisions, you can’t
put your trash out on the curb before garbage day.

It struck me that we’ll agree to
strong covenants when it comes to our pocketbook and our home, but we won’t
agree to strong covenants when it comes to our soul. This from a people who have covenants woven
throughout their heritage (look at 2 Chron. 23:3 for an example).

A strong covenant in our society
today might be, “We agree that if any financial difficulty happens to you, we
will help meet it.” Or, “we will help
love and discipline your children.”
Or, “we covenant to build the Kingdom together in tangible ways.”

The only covenant besides marriage
I have heard regularly made is the covenant people make in churches that
dedicate their children to the Lord. It
sounds good, but it’s usually an example of a weak, empty covenant. Most of those “covenant children” being born today (an average
of 96% if you believe the stats), will wander from the faith and pursue an
ungodly path. In all my years in a church
that had this as a central tenant, I never saw the church take strategic steps
to follow through on the supposed covenantal promises that we solemnly made to
one another. In fact, many of the young
people I watched be dedicated have since wandered far from the faith.

The issue at stake here is our heritage and our inheritance. Will we be a generation that breaks out of our cultural norms? Will we be a family that decides to be different?

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