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Update #2 on the Swazi baby we found

I wrote a blog about a baby who was found on his AIDS-infected mom as she was near death. Here’s what our team is doing to care for the baby. From Megan Dunegan: The baby – “Moses” we are calling him now – is doing better every day! We have had him for about 2 weeks now, and he has gained ab…
By Seth Barnes
By Seth Barnes

I wrote a blog
about a baby who was found on his AIDS-infected mom as she was near
death. Here’s what our team is doing to care for the baby. From
Megan Dunegan:

The
baby – “Moses” we are calling him now – is doing better every day! We
have had him for about 2 weeks now, and he has gained about one pound
since he’s been with us.

His mother has signed over indefinite custody
of him to us. We took him from Nsoko to Manzini yesterday so he could
go to a nutritionist.

The mother has been diagnosed with TB. Moses is
too small to be checked, but the doctors said he’s more likely to have
pneumonia. He has been admitted into the hospital for observation. We
are taking shift staying with him there. Both his blood counts are a
little off, but they have him on medication and IV’s. We believe he
will be ok. As far as the mother, we are not sure. My team and I are
trying to line up a place for Moses if her condition doesn’t change
before we have to leave Africa.

This update is from Krystle Esch:

There’s
been a recent addition to our family. His name is Mcolisi (pronounced
with a click), which means “peacemaker” in Siswati, and he’s a
beautiful, 5 ½ week-old baby. His four older siblings attend one of the
care points that our team works at. His father abandoned the family,
and his mother, Pelile, is sick with AIDS, unable to care for him. His
7 year-old sister was in the process of learning to be a mother when we
learned of their situation.

Pelile
agreed to let us care for him, so long as we bring him to the care
point each time we go so that she can see him. When Traci took him from
his home last week he was severely dehydrated and malnourished,
weighing less than 5 pounds. Since then his health has been improving,
and it’s been a relief to hear him crying more these last few days as
he gains strength.

We’ve
been giving him antibiotics for a respiratory infection, and some
special nutrients and electrolytes in addition to his regular formula.
His “crib” is a wash basin that is the perfect size for his tiny body.
A few of us have been taking turns with him sleeping in our tents,
since his coughing and crying keeps at least one of us up most of the
night.

Having
him has been a huge joy to our team. In less than a week I’ve grown to
love him so much. It’s never tiring to watch his tiny face with its
growing variety of expressions. He’s passed from one set of arms to the
next throughout the day, and he’s a constant source of attention for
the staff and tourists at the safari.

We’re
not sure yet what’s going to happen to him when we leave. Pelile was
admitted to the hospital the day before yesterday. There are several
excellent homes for abandoned and orphaned babies that we know of, but
it’s a difficult and serious thing to ask a mother to sign over
adoption papers, even when she could be dying.

So
for now he’s ours. We pray, prophesy, and speak life over him every
day, dreaming about the possibilities that his life holds and the
peacemaker that he’s going to be.

For more stories and pictures of Mcolisi, check out:

Comments (2)

  • Thanks, Seth. As I reviewed this today I prayed that God would renew me with the sensitivity to “see beyond the story” and see Him at work in the midst of it. The needs of the world and our response (or lack of one) is the drama of the Gospel.

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Seth Barnes

I'm motivated to join God in his global reclamation project. He's on the move, setting his sons and daughters free from their places of captivity. And he's partnering with those of us who have been freed to go and free others.



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