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What do you do with your brokenness?

Manning 1bd8feb2
One of the great struggles we all face is to come to the place where we can recognize our brokenness and be OK with it. I was 31 when that happened for me. Man, was it hard to go through.   But I’m one of the lucky ones. A lot of older people still have not come to the place where the…
By Seth Barnes
One of the great struggles we all face is to come to the place where we can recognize our brokenness and be OK with it. I was 31 when that happened for me. Man, was it hard to go through.
 
But I’m one of the lucky ones.
A lot of older people still have not come to the place where they can own their brokenness. They live in prisons of selfishness. Their addictions and defensiveness keep them from facing the truth that would set them free.
ManningOver the holidays I read Brennan Manning’s memoir, All is Grace. In it he admits to lying for much of his life. He bravely discusses his alcoholism and its impact. He said it’s called “the liar’s disease.” It’s amazing that this man who so many have looked up to has struggled so to be honest about his brokenness.
 
Manning says, “Sin and forgiveness and falling and getting back up and losing the pearl
of great price in the couch cushions but then finding it again, and
again, and again? Those are the stumbling steps to becoming Real, the
only script that’s really worth following in this world.”
Yet it’s so hard to embrace your own brokenness. To admit it and even talk openly about it.
 
When Jesus came to set the captive free, that’s all of us who have kept our brokenness locked up in some secret place, never allowing anyone to see it or touch it. He wants to set us free to look at reality.
 
All the abusive dads and neurotic moms. All the lonely hearts who for too long have believed lies about ourselves.
 
“I’m not good enough.” “I’m ugly.” “I’m average.” “I deserve this mess I live in.” “I’ll never escape this addiction to pornography.” “I’ll never be married.” On and on go the lies.
 
The truth is, we’re all broken and we need to embrace our brokenness instead of locking it away. Only then are we able to reach out and help others embrace their brokenness as well.
 
It’s the basis of ministry. I love what Louie Giglio said at the recently completed Passion Conference: “”Brokenness is the bow from which God launches the arrows of healing.”
 
Do you want to be used of God? It begins with your own places of pain. Let him touch them. Let others in where you’ve kept them out. The freedom on the other side is amazing.
 
“Out of brokenness, fearlessness,” Giglio said. “The only thing I’m afraid of is living an insignificant life.”

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