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What season of life am I in?

I’ve watched young people struggle under the pressure of needing to perform. We all need pressure, but some of it is unnecessary, born of a people-pleasing spirit or a sense of inadequacy. One of the best ways to relieve the stress of feeling inadequate is to change the expectations you’r…
By Seth Barnes
By Seth Barnes
I’ve watched young people struggle under the pressure of needing to perform. We all need pressure, but some of it is unnecessary, born of a people-pleasing spirit or a sense of inadequacy.
One of the best ways to relieve the stress of feeling inadequate is to change the expectations you’re listening to. I’ve found it helpful for young people to look at life as having five seasons, roughly divided into decades. As you develop, your focus changes.
 
1. Season of development
In your first two decades of life you grow in every way. The focus is your growth. Just the process of developing requires a lot of energy. People mature at different rates – most obviously physically, but also emotionally, socially, spiritually and intellectually.
2. Learner
Your twenties are a season to press into a specific field and focus on developing a skill. Too many 20-somethings feel an urgency to accomplish a lot. They look at their peers and feel inadequate. My advice is apply yourself, but relax and focus more on getting good opportunities to learn. Apprenticeships are a great way to learn more about a field you’re interested in.
 
3. Doer
In your thirties, you begin to get traction. You’ve learned enough to be able to make a difference in your chosen field. You use the skills you’ve acquired to get stuff done. If you’re a manager, you’re still learning your craft.
4. Leader
Your forties are a season of learning how to work more effectively with others. Though not everyone is a leader, everyone can influence others and some will rise to the top and help groups move toward goals. Many people will remain behind, stuck in the season of the doer, not able to master the nuance of accomplishing tasks through others.
5. Mentor
As you move into your fifties and beyond, age becomes an issue. You’re more aware that “this isn’t about me” and you look for opportunities to give back. Your greatest joy may come not in what you accomplish, but in how you’re able to help others accomplish their goals as you mentor them.
 
Questions to ask in the season of the learner
1. What information or skills do I need to learn?
2. Who can help me learn?
3. How do I learn best?
4. How can I maximize my learning?
5. How will my learning connect to my purpose?
*          *           *         *          *        *        *
Where are you? Have you given much thought to what will help you make the transition to the next level?

Comments (6)

  • Great perspective! As someone clearly in the “learning” season, I am quite guilty of trying to accomplish goals and of focusing on “doing.” Talia keeps reminding me what you say about people in their 20’s, and it reminds be to cool down and take a breath. Good questions to ponder.

  • Another book idea? These phases with many stories of people along the way from people at different stages, lessons learned there could a good book. I know you know alot of people and have seen alot do things well, poorly and learned. Just a thought 🙂

  • Incredible advice, now I have to answer those 5 questions and gain understanding of where I am at in my process of learning. New thoughts to ponder over :))

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Seth Barnes

I'm motivated to join God in his global reclamation project. He's on the move, setting his sons and daughters free from their places of captivity. And he's partnering with those of us who have been freed to go and free others.



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