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Women seem to hear God better than men

At age 14, Falyn Gliko, a young lady from Tennessee on a mission trip to Kenya, heard God urging her to do something. She was in an evening worship service and knew that God wanted to heal some of the hundreds of Kenyans in the audience. So she jumped up and went to the front, grabbed the micro…
By Seth Barnes

At age 14, Falyn Gliko, a young lady from Tennessee on a mission trip to Kenya, heard God urging her to do something. She was in an evening worship service and knew that God wanted to heal some of the hundreds of Kenyans in the audience. So she jumped up and went to the front, grabbed the microphone and called people to come forward to receive prayer for healing!

It wasn’t in the bulletin and nobody had trained her to do that.  Her team looked on in astonishment, amazed at her boldness. Dozens came down the aisles. They prayed and God showed up to back Falyn with his miraculous power.

I love seeing young people discover their greatness as they trust God in thrilling new ways like that. It’s happening all the time around the world. Young Jesus-followers are going into dark places and are bringing hope.

Before he left the earth, Jesus issued a call to go and make disciples. And today, with radical Islam vying for souls, the stakes couldn’t be higher. Someone needs to take Jesus at his word and seek out the least of these hidden from view around the globe. But in the world of missions, it is more frequently women who respond to this call.

The ministry I work with, Adventures In Missions, has taken over 70,000 people on short-term missions trips. Participants go from one week to a year. Karen and I have experienced this fruit personally as three of our four girls have gone overseas for a year. Their year abroad completely rearranged their lives and turned them into world-changers, making them more interested in the Kingdom of God than their own personal agendas.

They’re part of a phenomenon we see all the time – the longer the duration of mission trips, the greater the proportion of women responding to them. At AIM our three-month and one year trips are consistently about 75% female. Nor is this unusual in the world of missions. Why is that?

For one thing, women seem to understand the stakes better than most men do, and frankly my observation is, they tend to be more spiritually mature. They understand that there is a world of hopeless people waiting to be touched and they tend to be more naturally compassionate than men.
What’s more, in many countries, it’s sad to say, but they work much harder than do men. They don’t want to sit by and wait for the men to get with the program. In countries like Kenya, the women carry the water and the men drink it.

Look at a few of the women warriors in Scripture: Deborah, Esther, and Priscilla come to mind. They advanced the Lord’s kingdom where men could not.

So, where are all the men? There are some great ones out there. My own son, Seth Jr., is spending a year on the World Race as are world changing guys like Sean Smith and Casey Barefield. And there are many like Justin Rhodes who are finding greatness in their own way back here in the States – you don’t have to go overseas to be a radical.

That said, so many guys seem to be encumbered by a number of issues: Expectations to get a job and start a career. Debt loads from school. Distractions that bog them down. I wish I had more answers for them. My heart is crying out for this generation’s young men. They have so much to offer and I just don’t know how to reach them.

God is calling out a whole generation of radicals, but it’s the women are responding first and most boldly. What’s your take on this?

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