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Working on Problems that Matter

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We all work on problems, but how many of them really matter? That is to say, a problem that matters to God.  Many of us have problems that don’t matter to anyone other than ourselves. For example, the problem of finding a video game that is more stimulating than the last one. Or the problem…
By Seth Barnes

We all work on problems, but how many of them really matter? That is to say, a problem that matters to God. 

Many of us have problems that don’t matter to anyone other than ourselves. For example, the problem of finding a video game that is more stimulating than the last one. Or the problem of trying to lower your golf handicap. 

Martin Luther King worked on a problem that mattered, the systemic oppression of an entire race of people. We have the opportunity to follow his lead and work on problems that matter. Here are a few:

Widows who are distressed

Orphans needing love

Young people who feel like orphans

Poor people needing food and water

Oppressed people needing freedom

Young girls caught in the sex trade

Sick people needing healing

People of all stripes needing Jesus

Lonely people needing community

Young people needing discipleship

We need better problems, problems that matter. How much time do we spend thinking about and working on problems that matter?

We can put our problems in perspective. We do that by coming into contact with the problems of other people. If we don’t see their problems, we can’t know how small our problems may be.

What problems are you currently working on? 

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