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Fathers, call out your children (part 2)

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Second in a series on fathering Perhaps one of the most prevalent needs of a child for their father is to have someone to “launch” them into the world. It is a father who says “I love you. You were created to do great things in the Kingdom. I have taught you well, and now you are ready to leave …
By Seth Barnes

Second in a series on fathering

Perhaps one of the most prevalent needs of a child for their father is to have someone to “launch” them into the world. It is a father who says “I love you. You were created to do great things in the Kingdom. I have taught you well, and now you are ready to leave the nest and go into the world.”

father sonWe can see twice in scriptures where Jesus was affirmed by his heavenly Father. When Jesus was baptized, the heavens opened and a voice spoke, saying, “This is My beloved Son, in whom I am well-pleased.” (Matthew 3:17) Once more, during the transfiguration, God spoke, saying, “This is My beloved Son, with whom I am well-pleased.” (Matt. 17:5) He was called out by his father; given an identity.

Do we not seek the same affirmation from our earthly fathers? For those who are without an earthly father (or a father aware of such responsibilities), the call is just as important. It can shape the choices that we make regarding vocation, relationship, and our spiritual journey.

We can see over and over again where the lack of this voice leads to uninitiated and disillusioned young adults. In a world absent of this identity given by fathers, we notice that young people will seek it from wherever they can find it – television, peers, internet, pop-culture. They will begin to follow a path of materialism, self-destruction, or worthless pursuits, in place of their true destiny.

Perhaps one role of those who understand this affirmation is to provide it for those who are not receiving it. We do this both through a discipleship relationship, as well as pointing to the heavenly Father and listening for his call. There are countless “orphans” waiting for their call – those still with parents but without a father living out his role.

 

 

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