Skip to main content

Talking Jesus doll – product of a consumeristic society?

Today is Thanksgiving, and here in the Barnes house, we are grateful for so much. Having Talia and Estie home is reason enough to give thanks, but we are also celebrating the presence of family friend Kevin Rubottom this week. Our home has a festive atmosphere and rings with laughter. Our spiri…
By Seth Barnes

Today is Thanksgiving, and here in the Barnes house, we are grateful for so much. Having Talia and Estie home is reason enough to give thanks, but we are also celebrating the presence of family friend Kevin Rubottom this week. Our home has a festive atmosphere and rings with laughter. Our spirits tingle with a sense that “life is very good.”

Tomorrow is the busiest shopping day of the year. Here’s a toy for that child that has everything. Is it just me, or this trivializing our faith? It’s symptomatic of a culture that is perpetually mistaking form for function, ends for means and style for substance. How do we navigate to reality in such a world? This news article came out earlier this month:

Talking Jesus
Doll Stirs Debate

Figure To Test
How Religion, Retail Mix

POSTED: 8:52 pm
PDT November 2, 2007
UPDATED: 10:28
pm PDT November 2, 2007

PHOENIX —
Controversy is
swirling over a foot-long, talking Jesus doll that Wal-Mart has put up for sale
at more than 400 of its stores in at least 20 states, including some in the
Valley.

It’s the first
time the world’s largest retailer has carried a full line of religious
toys.

The
battery-powered, button-activated doll is able to recite a handful of different
bible verses and the story of Jesus feeding the multitudes with five loaves and
two fish. It also comes with a booklet giving parents tips on how to shape a
child’s faith.

Not everyone is
lining up to shell out $14.97 for the made-in-China
plaything.

“You can learn
it at Sunday School,” said shopper Angie Librizzi. “It doesn’t have to be a
doll.”

Other shoppers
said it trivializes religion. They also believe children will handle the Jesus
doll much like they do with secular mass-merchandised action-figures, which they
don’t feel is appropriate.

What are your thoughts? Is this a valid ministry or selling out?

Comments (3)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *